Systematic Review Workshop: The Nuts and Bolts for Librarians

Monday, July 14, 2014 through Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Registration Closed. The Workshop is now full.

2.5 Days – 20 MLA Continuing Education Credits

Where: Health Sciences Library System (HSLS), University of Pittsburgh - Falk Library of the Health Sciences, 200 Scaife Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Take your search skills and librarian expertise to the next level by attending this 2.5 day workshop. This course provides a comprehensive framework and discussion of the librarian’s role in the systematic review process, with special emphasis on successful completion of the literature search.

A panel of expert health science librarians and searchers, comprised of members of the HSLS Systematic Review Group, will provide attendees with a vast array of examples and challenges!

Sessions will feature a mixture of small and large group discussion, interactive lectures, and hands-on exercises. Topics covered will include: 1) Understanding the structure and purpose of systematic reviews 2) The reference interview and communication issues 3) Approaches to comprehensive literature searching and 4) Project organization.

This course is not designed to provide in-depth or advanced training in the searching of specific databases. Rather, participants will acquire an understanding of the theory and practice of systematic reviews and librarian's role(s) in the systematic review process. The intended outcome is to prepare you to become a systematic review team collaborator and a facilitator in the systematic review process. This class grew out of an internal working group organized by the Health Sciences Library System to address an increasing number of requests from university/medical center faculty for assistance with systematic reviews and instruction in systematic review literature searching.

Who should attend: Health science and medical librarians who wish to acquire the core knowledge needed to collaborate in the conduct of systematic reviews, technology effectiveness reports, comparative effectiveness research, or any other scholarly or clinical activity requiring comprehensive literature searches.